Does GDPR prevent the sharing of safeguarding information?

Does GDPR override safeguarding?

In relation to Safeguarding, GDPR does not prevent, or limit, the sharing of information for the purposes of keeping children safe. Legal and secure information sharing between schools, children’s social care and other local agencies is essential for keeping children safe and ensuring they get the support they need.

Does data protection prevent you from sharing safeguarding concerns?

Information can be shared lawfully within the parameters of the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). … The management interests of an organisation should not override the need to share information to safeguard adults at risk of abuse.

When can information be shared in relation to safeguarding?

Relevant personal information can also be shared lawfully if it is to keep a child or individual at risk safe from neglect or physical, emotional or mental harm, or if it is protecting their physical, mental, or emotional well-being.

What is information sharing in safeguarding?

Information sharing is crucial for effective safeguarding of children and young people and essential for effective identification, assessment, risk management and service provision. … Sharing information between organisations can improve decision making so that actions are taken in the best interests of the child.

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Does GDPR apply to safeguarding?

GDPR does not ‘trump’ safeguarding if you have concerns about sharing information about a safeguarding matter – whether within the school or externally. You won’t need the individual’s consent to share the information in most circumstances.

Why is GDPR important in safeguarding?

The GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018 place duties on organisations and individuals to process personal information fairly and lawfully; they are not a barrier to sharing information, where the failure to do so would cause the safety or well-being of a child to be compromised.

Does data protection law apply to safeguarding matters?

GDPR does not ‘trump’ safeguarding if you have concerns about sharing information about a safeguarding matter – whether within the school or externally. You won’t need the individual’s consent to share the information in most circumstances.

What does the Data Protection Act 1998 say about sharing information?

The Data Protection Act 1998 is an important piece of legislation giving confidence to individuals that their personal data will be treated appropriately and that it will not be misused. Its job is to balance individuals’ rights to privacy with legitimate and proportionate use of personal information by organisations.

What are GDPR rules?

GDPR’s seven principles are: lawfulness, fairness and transparency; purpose limitation; data minimisation; accuracy; storage limitation; integrity and confidentiality (security); and accountability. In reality, only one of these principles – accountability – is new to data protection rules.

When should you share information without consent in safeguarding?

Information can be shared without consent if it is justified in the public interest or required by law. Do not delay disclosing information to obtain consent if that might put children or young people at risk of significant harm.

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Is it OK to share information when concerned about the wellbeing and safety of a child?

If a professional has concerns about a child’s welfare and believes they are suffering, or likely to suffer, harm, then they should share the information with local authority children’s social care. … Early sharing of information is the key to providing effective early help where there are emerging problems.

When can you disclose confidential information?

Generally, you can disclose confidential information where: The individual has given consent. The information is in the public interest (that is, the public is at risk of harm due to a patient’s condition) … The information is in the public domain already.